Hip movements

A wide range of movement is possible at the hip due to the ball and socket articulation.

• Flexion (0-120°): iliacus and psoas predominantly. Rectus femoris, sartorius and pectineus to a lesser degree.

• Extension (0-20°): gluteus maximus and the hamstrings.

• Adduction (0-30°): adductor magnus, longus and brevis predominantly. Gracilis and pectineus to a lesser degree.

• Abduction (0-45°): gluteus medius, gluteus minimis and tensor fasciae latae.

• Lateral rotation (0-45°): piriformis, obturators, the gemelli, quadratus femoris and gluteus maximus.

• Medial rotation (0-45°): tensor fasciae latae, gluteus medius and gluteus minimis.

• Circumduction: this is a combination of all movements utilizing all muscle groups mentioned.

Iliolumbar ligament

Body weight

Long and short posterior ligaments

Greater sciatic foramen

Sacrospinous ligament Sacrotuberous ligament

Body weight

Hip Movements

Fig.46.5

The ligaments of the back of the hip.

The smaller diagram shows how the sacrotuberous and sacrospinous ligaments resist rotation of the sacrum

Arteries from capsule in retinacula

Artery in ligamentum teres

Sacrotuberous ligament

Ischiofemoral ligament

Fig.46.5

The ligaments of the back of the hip.

The smaller diagram shows how the sacrotuberous and sacrospinous ligaments resist rotation of the sacrum

Subcapital

Cervical

Basal

Intracapsular Pertrochanteric —Extracapsular

Fig.46.6

The terminology of fractures of the neck of the femur. Fractures near the head can cause avascular necrosis because of the disruption of the arterial supply to the head

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment