The deep fascia of the thigh fascia lata

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This layer of strong fascia covers the thigh. It is attached above to the inguinal ligament and bony margins of the pelvis and below to the tibial condyles, head of the fibula and patella. Three fascial septa pass from the deep surface of the fascia lata to insert onto the linea aspera of the femur and consequently divide the thigh into three compartments.

On the lateral side the fascia lata is condensed to form the iliotibial tract (Fig. 47.4). The tract is attached above to the iliac crest and receives the insertions of tensor fasciae latae and three-quarters of gluteus maximus. These muscles are also enveloped in deep fascia. The ili-otibial tract inserts into the lateral condyle of the tibia.

The saphenous opening is a gap in the deep fascia which is filled with loose connective tissue—the cribriform fascia. The lateral border of the opening, the falciform margin, curves in front of the femoral vessels whereas on the medial side it curves behind to attach to the iliopectineal line (Fig. 43.1). The great saphenous vein pierces the cribriform fascia to drain into the femoral vein. Superficial branches of the femoral artery and lymphatics are also transmitted through the saphenous opening.

Nerve to vastus medialis

Fascia Cribriforma

Fig.47.3

A section through the thigh to show the adductor (subsartorial) canal

Nerve to vastus medialis

Saphenous nerve

Sartorius Femoral vessels

Great saphenous vein Adductor longus Profunda vessels

Gracilis

Adductor brevis Adductor magnus

Fig.47.3

A section through the thigh to show the adductor (subsartorial) canal

Rectus femoris Vastus lateralis Vastus medialis Iliotibial tract Vastus intermedius

Sciatic nerve

Long

Semimembranosus Semitendinosus

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