What is kyphoplasty Would it help my spinal fractures

Spinal (or vertebral) fractures are a major concern for men and women with osteoporosis because they can lead to severe pain and disability (see Question 84). These fractures can also lead to kyphosis (see Figure 13 in Question 83). The spine deteriorates and curves due to fractures in individual vertebrae. Most osteoporotic vertebral fractures are traditionally treated with pain medications and a gradual return to normal activities. Although back braces to prevent twisting and support the spine were used in the past, they are infrequently

Exercises to Improve Deformity and Reduce Pain

Exercises to Improve Deformity and Reduce Pain

Spine Exercise

Figure 16 Exercises to prevent or improve deformity and reduce pain. Source: Duke University Medical Center's Bone and Metabolic Disease Clinic. Reprinted with permission. Gold DT, Lee LS, Tresolini CP, eds. Working with Patients to Prevent, Treat, and Manage Osteoporosis: A Curriculum Guide for the Health Professions, 3rd ed. Durham, NC: Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center; 2001.

Figure 16 Exercises to prevent or improve deformity and reduce pain. Source: Duke University Medical Center's Bone and Metabolic Disease Clinic. Reprinted with permission. Gold DT, Lee LS, Tresolini CP, eds. Working with Patients to Prevent, Treat, and Manage Osteoporosis: A Curriculum Guide for the Health Professions, 3rd ed. Durham, NC: Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University Medical Center; 2001.

used today. Immobility associated with the brace or bed rest can increase the risk for blood clots, isolation, depression, and increased bone loss, and is usually not advised (see Question 83).

Kyphoplasty

A surgical procedure used to relieve pain of VCFs, which combines vertebroplasty and angioplasty by placing a balloon in the fractured vertebra and filling it with a cement-like substance.

Kyphoplasty is a surgical procedure that helps to correct the collapse of the lumbar (lower back) and thoracic (mid to upper back) vertebrae. More important, this procedure can significantly reduce the pain of fractures and help individuals return to normal activities, sometimes within hours of surgery. Kyphoplasty is normally reserved for patients experiencing significant pain for at least 3 to 4 weeks, patients who may be in danger of developing bedsores from extended bed rest and immobility, and those who are not responding to conservative treatment.

Vertebroplasty

A nonsurgical procedure that involves injecting a cementlike substance into the fractured vertebra to stabilize it and relieve pain.

For kyphoplasty, an incision is made in the spine under local anesthesia. The patient can be awake so that pain and neurological problems arising from the surgery can be immediately identified. An uninflated balloonlike instrument is inserted into the vertebra. The balloon is inflated, increasing the space within the vertebra. Sometimes this maneuver straightens the vertebra. Sometimes it doesn't. The balloon is removed and a special cement compound fills in the space, somewhat like a cast supporting the bone. Pain relief is almost immediate. Being able to resume normal daily activities can also be expected, thereby reducing the amount of disability caused by the vertebral fractures. Kyphoplasty is not a substitute for other treatments for osteoporosis, however. You may still need to take prescription medications, and you must take adequate calcium and Vitamin D. You should also exercise regularly once your clinician has given you the go-ahead after surgery.

Kyphoplasty was originally based on the principles of vertebroplasty, which is a procedure usually performed by radiologists who inject a cement-like substance into the fractured vertebrae using special x-ray techniques. This procedure does not require a surgical incision and does not use the balloon technique before cement is injected. Patients have said that they get immediate relief from the pain caused by the fractures.

Kyphoplasty is also used for patients with vertebral fractures resulting from metastases (that is, spread of disease from one part of the body to another) of cancers, which weaken bones, often in the spine. These fractures are extremely painful. The surgical procedure for fractures that result from metastases is often followed by radiofre-quency waves to the affected areas of the spine.

86. Besides adding calcium and Vitamin D, should I be changing anything in my diet? I heard that drinking alcohol could increase my risk of osteoporosis. Do I have to stop drinking entirely?

It's important to not only add calcium and Vitamin D, but to make sure you are getting all of the necessary nutrients for bone growth, such as folate, phosphorus, magnesium, and protein. Evaluating your diet has become easier because the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has revamped its food pyramid to adjust for the many diseases and conditions affected by your diet and nutrition. Visit the new USDA Web site (www.mypyramid.gov) and find the pyramid that is right for your age, gender, and physical activity level (see Questions 48-54). A recent study of men and women who ate a strict vegetarian raw food diet for up to 10 years showed that this type of diet is associated with lower bone density. Overall, the participants had an average BMI of 20, a known risk factor for osteoporosis, and they consumed no animal sources of calcium such as dairy products. However, because they spent more time in the sun than their nonvegetarian counterparts, they were not deficient in Vitamin D. See Question 51.

Alcohol is an interesting paradox when it comes to osteoporosis. Although heavy alcohol consumption can bring about major social, financial, and health problems, mild-to-moderate consumption is associated with decreased rates of osteoporosis as well as decreased rates of heart attack, stroke, and diabetes. The Nurses' Health Study showed that women who drank moderate amounts of alcohol had higher bone mineral densities at the spine than their non-drinking counterparts. Heavy alcohol consumption, though, increases bone breakdown, meaning that you are more likely to have weaker bones. But since moderate consumption contributes in a positive way to bone formation, you can continue to drink moderately with a diagnosis of osteoporosis.

But what is moderate consumption? The latest dietary guidelines from the USDA recommend that alcohol intake be limited to one alcoholic beverage per day for women and two per day for men. One alcoholic beverage equals one 12-ounce beer, one 5-ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 ounces of hard liquor, such as vodka, rum, whiskey, etc. In general, red wine with a meal is commonplace in the Mediterranean countries where heart disease is less frequent than in the United States. A glass of wine can be considered therapeutic, but you should remember that 5 ounces does not fill up the typical wine glass. Naturally, any amount of alcohol can impair your judgment and reflexes, so it's important not to drive, operate machinery, or engage in any activities that require skill and coordination if you have consumed alcohol.

Alcohol should be avoided by those who can't restrict the number of drinks they take, pregnant and breastfeeding women, women of childbearing age who may become pregnant, children and adolescents, those who are taking medications that are dangerous to take with alcohol, and those with certain medical conditions.

None of the medications that are prescribed for osteoporosis are dangerous to take with alcohol. However, if you are taking any of the bisphosphonates, you should always wait the required length of time (30 minutes to 2 hours) after taking the medication before eating or drinking anything.

Beat The Battle With The Bottle

Beat The Battle With The Bottle

Alcoholism is something that can't be formed in easy terms. Alcoholism as a whole refers to the circumstance whereby there's an obsession in man to keep ingesting beverages with alcohol content which is injurious to health. The circumstance of alcoholism doesn't let the person addicted have any command over ingestion despite being cognizant of the damaging consequences ensuing from it.

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Responses

  • mehari
    Can you perform a bone density if a patient had kyphoplasty?
    3 months ago

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