Introduction

Drains are designated to evacuate intraperitoneal fluid collections. They can be used for diagnostic, prophylactic, or therapeutic purposes. In upper gastrointestinal surgery, diagnostic drains are mainly placed to assess intraperitoneal fluid collections in order to establish a diagnosis. These drains are seldom left in place and are, therefore, of minor importance. In contrast, prophylactic drains placed at the end of an operation are used frequently with two intentions: first, to prevent fluid accumulations which could be harmful (i. e., pancreatic juice or bile) or to evacuate fluid collections that can become infected and lead to the formation of intra-abdominal abscesses; second, prophylactic drains may be used to detect early postoperative complications, such as intra-abdominal bleeding or anastomotic leakage. Sometimes, fluid collections become infected and develop into abscesses; the management of these collections requires therapeutic drainage either by the percutaneous route or by reoperative surgical lavage.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
How to Stay Young

How to Stay Young

For centuries, ever since the legendary Ponce de Leon went searching for the elusive Fountain of Youth, people have been looking for ways to slow down the aging process. Medical science has made great strides in keeping people alive longer by preventing and curing disease, and helping people to live healthier lives. Average life expectancy keeps increasing, and most of us can look forward to the chance to live much longer lives than our ancestors.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment