Rocker Bottom Foot Deformity

Figure 1.109. Talipes equinovarus (congenital clubfoot). There has been much discussion as to whether this is a true congenital malformation or whether it occurs as a result of a postural deformity (intrauterine molding). The foot cannot be dorsiflexed to the normal position and the heel is fixed in the varus deformity.

1.110

Figure 1.110. Another view of the foot of the same infant.

1.111

Figure 1.111. Talipes equinovarus (congenital clubfoot) in an infant with Poland's anomaly. Talipes equinovarus is frequently associated with congenital hip dysplasia, neural tube defects, and neuromus-cular conditions.

Congenital Talipes EquinovarusCongenital Hip Dysplasia

Figure 1.111. Talipes equinovarus (congenital clubfoot) in an infant with Poland's anomaly. Talipes equinovarus is frequently associated with congenital hip dysplasia, neural tube defects, and neuromus-cular conditions.

Congenital Talipes Equinovarus
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Figure 1.112. The same infant showing the position of the feet in utero, suggesting that the defect occurred as a result of a congenital postural deformity. In infants with clubfoot occurring as a congenital malformation, skin dimples are not present at the ankles, whereas in infants with clubfoot associated with postural deformations, dimples may be present over the joint as is noted in this infant.

Figure 1.113. Bilateral clubfoot in an infant with myotonic dystrophy. The lack of fetal movement in utero caused this deformity. Clubfoot is commonly seen in infants with neuromus-cular diseases such as neural tube defects and amyotonia congenita (Oppenheim's disease).

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Figure 1.114. Rocker-bottom feet are noted in this infant with trisomy 18. Posterior calcaneal extension is present and the convex appearance of the sole of the foot resembles a "rocking chair."

Figure 1.114. Rocker-bottom feet are noted in this infant with trisomy 18. Posterior calcaneal extension is present and the convex appearance of the sole of the foot resembles a "rocking chair."

Photos Robinow Syndrome

1.114

1.115

Figure 1.115. This infant with a neural tube defect presents a classic appearance of rocker-bottom feet with marked posterior calcaneal extension. Rocker-bottom feet are commonly seen in infants with neural tube defects.

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