Newborn Marfan Syndrome

Marfan Syndrome Newborn

Figure 3.98. A term newborn with Marfan syndrome who had a birth weight of 3720 g and a length of 54 cm. Note the tall stature with long slim limbs and hypotonia. In Marfan syndrome, limbs are disproportionately long and trunk length is usually normal resulting in a low upper/lower segment ratio. Ophthalmologic and cardiovascular pathologies, such as dislocation of the lens and aneurys-mal dilatation of the aorta, are usually noted after the neonatal period.

Figure 3.98. A term newborn with Marfan syndrome who had a birth weight of 3720 g and a length of 54 cm. Note the tall stature with long slim limbs and hypotonia. In Marfan syndrome, limbs are disproportionately long and trunk length is usually normal resulting in a low upper/lower segment ratio. Ophthalmologic and cardiovascular pathologies, such as dislocation of the lens and aneurys-mal dilatation of the aorta, are usually noted after the neonatal period.

Figure 3.99. In this infant with Marfan syndrome, note the marked lengthening of the fingers (arach-nodactyly). The diagnosis of Marfan syndrome may be difficult in the neonatal period because many normal infants appear to have long fingers. The combination of an increased birth length and a decreased upper / lower segment ratio should alert one to the possibility of this diagnosis. In older children the disproportion can often be detected by noting that the finger tips reach much further down die thigh than usual in the standing position.

Figure 3.100. In Marfan syndrome when die patient makes a fist, die thumb often extends beyond the fifth finger as shown in the same infant.

Marfan Syndrome Infant

Figure 3.101. This neonate with Marfan syndrome exhibits the long fingers with increased creases on die fingers. This finding is common in infants who have increased mobility and hyperextensibility at the joints during development in utero and is seen in conditions such as Marfan syndrome and Larsen's syndrome.

Arachnodactyly

3.101

Figure 3.102. The same infant with Marfan syndrome shows the long foot and arachnodactyly.

Marfan Syndrome

3.102

Marfan Toes

Figure 3.103. This is another example of long feet and toes in an infant with Marfan syndrome. Note the bilateral congenital curly toes. This infant had a birth length of 53 cm and an upper/lower segment ratio of 1.41. The normal upper/lower segment ratio at birth is 1.69 to 1.70. In short-limbed dwarfism and hypothyroidism it averages 1.8 or more, and in Marfan syndrome it averages 1.45.

Your Heart and Nutrition

Your Heart and Nutrition

Prevention is better than a cure. Learn how to cherish your heart by taking the necessary means to keep it pumping healthily and steadily through your life.

Get My Free Ebook


Responses

  • Hobson
    What is the finger length of a newborn with marfan?
    5 years ago

Post a comment