Prominent Occiput Infant

Metatropic Dysplasia

Figure 2.61. Radiograph of an infant with metatropic dysplasia. This is another form of dwarfism associated with a narrow thorax, thoracic kyphoscoliosis and metaphyseal flaring (giving the typical "dumb-bell" appearance). The proportion of the length of the trunk to the extremities reverses during childhood. At first the trunk is too long and the extremities too short. With increasing kyphoscoliosis the trunk becomes short.

Figure 2.61. Radiograph of an infant with metatropic dysplasia. This is another form of dwarfism associated with a narrow thorax, thoracic kyphoscoliosis and metaphyseal flaring (giving the typical "dumb-bell" appearance). The proportion of the length of the trunk to the extremities reverses during childhood. At first the trunk is too long and the extremities too short. With increasing kyphoscoliosis the trunk becomes short.

Figure 2.62. Radiograph of the lower extremities of the same infant showing the short limbs with typical "dumb-bell" appearance of the femora, which occurs as a result of huge epiphyses. There is hypoplasia of the basilar pelvis with horizontal acetabula, a short, deep sacroiliac notch, and squared iliac wings.

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Metatropic Dysplasia

Figure 2.63. Radiograph of skull in an infant with metatropic dysplasia. Note the poor mineralization and the very prominent occiput.

Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type Skull

Figure 2.64. Type II osteogenesis imperfecta which is perinatally lethal. Death occurs before or shortly after birth. The lethal form is autosomally dominant but they are mostly new mutations. Rarely it is autosomally recessive. Note the markedly abnormal skull (which is soft and impressionable) and short limbs due to osteogenesis imperfecta. The damage to the neck and abdomen was present at birth.

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Figure 2.64. Type II osteogenesis imperfecta which is perinatally lethal. Death occurs before or shortly after birth. The lethal form is autosomally dominant but they are mostly new mutations. Rarely it is autosomally recessive. Note the markedly abnormal skull (which is soft and impressionable) and short limbs due to osteogenesis imperfecta. The damage to the neck and abdomen was present at birth.

Osteogenesis Imperfecta

2.65

Figure 2.65. Another infant with severe osteogenesis imperfecta with marked shortening of long bones due to multiple fractures in utero as seen in the upper extremities and a grossly abnormal hand. This infant is another example of type II osteogenesis imperfecta. The head is grossly abnormal. The ear is not truly low set but gives this appearance due to the abnormal skull.

Figure 2.66. This infant with short extremities due to multiple in utero fractures is an example of type III osteogenesis imperfecta. The head is slightly enlarged, giving the ears a low-set appearance.

Figure 2.65. Another infant with severe osteogenesis imperfecta with marked shortening of long bones due to multiple fractures in utero as seen in the upper extremities and a grossly abnormal hand. This infant is another example of type II osteogenesis imperfecta. The head is grossly abnormal. The ear is not truly low set but gives this appearance due to the abnormal skull.

Low Set Ears Infants

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Severe Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Figure 2.68. Another example of type III osteo-genesis imperfecta showing the bowing and shortening of limbs due to intrauterine fractures. The skull is large and abnormal due to the lack of mineralization and multiple wormian bones. This infant also has a narrow chest due to intrauterine fractures of the ribs.

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Figure 2.67. Total body radiograph of the same infant as in Figure 2.66 showing the numerous intrauterine fractures of the long bones of the extremities resulting in shortening of the extremities, and the intrauterine fractures of the ribs resulting in a narrow chest. Note the density above the right side of the pelvis. This is the umbilical cord stump which appears as an opacity in an abdominal radiograph where gas is lacking in the gastrointestinal tract.

Figure 2.67. Total body radiograph of the same infant as in Figure 2.66 showing the numerous intrauterine fractures of the long bones of the extremities resulting in shortening of the extremities, and the intrauterine fractures of the ribs resulting in a narrow chest. Note the density above the right side of the pelvis. This is the umbilical cord stump which appears as an opacity in an abdominal radiograph where gas is lacking in the gastrointestinal tract.

Wormian Bones Infants

Figure 2.68. Another example of type III osteo-genesis imperfecta showing the bowing and shortening of limbs due to intrauterine fractures. The skull is large and abnormal due to the lack of mineralization and multiple wormian bones. This infant also has a narrow chest due to intrauterine fractures of the ribs.

Figure 2.69. Radiograph of the skull in an infant with osteogenesis imperfecta. Note the lack of mineralization with wormian bones. Clinically one feels multiple small bones over the skull. There is a thin cortex with minimal skull ossification and generalized osteoporosis.

Femora Bone Bowed Images

Figure 2.71. Radiograph of osteogenesis imperfecta in a neonate. Note the fracture of the proximal part of the left femur and the marked bowing of the other long bones. This alerts one to the fact that mild forms of osteogenesis imperfecta may

Figure 2.70. Another radiograph of an infant with type III osteogenesis imperfecta. Note the intrauterine fractures and bowing of the long bones.

Figure 2.71. Radiograph of osteogenesis imperfecta in a neonate. Note the fracture of the proximal part of the left femur and the marked bowing of the other long bones. This alerts one to the fact that mild forms of osteogenesis imperfecta may occur.

Figure 2.72. Type III osteogenesis imperfecta in identical twins. Note die large heads and the bowing of the long bones due to mild intrauterine fractures.

Figure 2.72. Type III osteogenesis imperfecta in identical twins. Note die large heads and the bowing of the long bones due to mild intrauterine fractures.

Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type

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Getting Back Into Shape After The Pregnancy

Getting Back Into Shape After The Pregnancy

Once your pregnancy is over and done with, your baby is happily in your arms, and youre headed back home from the hospital, youll begin to realize that things have only just begun. Over the next few days, weeks, and months, youre going to increasingly notice that your entire life has changed in more ways than you could ever imagine.

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  • scarlet
    What is osteogenesis imperfecta?
    8 years ago

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