Coronal Closure In Newborn

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Figure 1.13. Note the typical long narrow skull of a premature infant with hypsicephaly. Hypsicephaly is a term used by anthropologists for "high heads" that are not pathologic or due to craniosynostosis. This term is used interchangeably with that of dolicho-cephaly when associated with prematurity.

Figure 1.13. Note the typical long narrow skull of a premature infant with hypsicephaly. Hypsicephaly is a term used by anthropologists for "high heads" that are not pathologic or due to craniosynostosis. This term is used interchangeably with that of dolicho-cephaly when associated with prematurity.

Dolichocephalic Newborn

Figure 1.14. The typical appearance of dolicho-cephaly associated with prematurity. In these infants the sagittal suture remains open. The long, narrow head of dolichocephaly is not present at birth but results from transient molding of the skull as a result of the infant lying on its side. The large head of the small premature infant restricts frequent movement of the head, and hence this appearance is a postural deformity. Craniosynostosis with premature fusion of the sagittal suture is different from this normal postural deformity of premature infants.

Figure 1.14. The typical appearance of dolicho-cephaly associated with prematurity. In these infants the sagittal suture remains open. The long, narrow head of dolichocephaly is not present at birth but results from transient molding of the skull as a result of the infant lying on its side. The large head of the small premature infant restricts frequent movement of the head, and hence this appearance is a postural deformity. Craniosynostosis with premature fusion of the sagittal suture is different from this normal postural deformity of premature infants.

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Fused Coronal Suture
Figure 1.15. Premature fusion of the sagittal suture in this infant has resulted in scapho-cephaly. Note the long, narrow head and the fused sagittal suture which presents as a ridge. This condition is more common in male infants.

Figure 1.16. Lateral view of the head of another infant with scaphocephaly. Note the frontal and posterior bossing of the head.

Figure 1.17. Craniosynostosis due to premature fusion of the coronal sutures has resulted in brachycephaly. Note the short, round appearance of the head with reduction of die anteroposterior diameter. This also occurs in Apert's syndrome and Carpenter's syndrome. Brachycephaly is also seen in infants with Down syndrome, Brachmann-de Lange syndrome, and cleidocranial dysostosis due to flattening of the occiput.

Picture Infant And Craniosynostosis

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1.18

Figure 1.18. Lateral view of the head of the same infant with craniosynostosis of the coronal sutures. Note the short, round appearance of the head and the flat occiput.

Flat OcciputMetopic Suture

Figure 1.19. Trigonocephaly is due to premature fusion of the metopic suture and is represented clinically by a triangular-shaped head. This condition may occur in utero or in the first months of life. It may occur in otherwise normal infants, but is also seen in infants with chromosomal anomalies or the median cleft syndrome.

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  • Tanja
    Why sutures are not present at birth?
    7 years ago
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