Carpenter Syndrome Pictures

Upward Slanting Palpebral Fissure
Figure 1.31. Another example of acro-cephalosyndactyly in an infant whose mother had the same condition. Note the turribrachycephaly, high steep frontal bones, protruding forehead, flat midface, small pinched nose, and the downward slant of the palpebral fissures.

1.33

Turribrachycephaly

Figure 1.33. In this figure of the same infant, note on the left die syndactyly of the hand and on the right die syndactyly of the foot. These infants have symmetrical syndactyly.

Carpenter Syndrome

Figure 1.34. In infants with Carpenter's syndrome (acrocephalopolysyndactyly), the facial appearance is similar to that of infants with Apert's syndrome; in addition, there is polysyn-dactyly. This infant with Carpenter's syndrome shows the high steep protruding forehead, the flat midface, the small pinched nose, and the downward slanting of the palpebral fissures.

Figure 1.34. In infants with Carpenter's syndrome (acrocephalopolysyndactyly), the facial appearance is similar to that of infants with Apert's syndrome; in addition, there is polysyn-dactyly. This infant with Carpenter's syndrome shows the high steep protruding forehead, the flat midface, the small pinched nose, and the downward slanting of the palpebral fissures.

Carpenter Syndrome Pictures
Figure 1.35. Oblique view of the same infant with Carpenter's syndrome shows the high steep forehead and turribrachycephaly. Note the ridges of the fused coronal sutures.

Figure 1.36. Frontal and lateral radiographs of the skull in the same infant show the premature fusion of the coronal sutures and the turribrachy-cephaly.

Figure 1.36. Frontal and lateral radiographs of the skull in the same infant show the premature fusion of the coronal sutures and the turribrachy-cephaly.

Carpenter Syndrome

1.36

Carpenter Syndrome Pictures

Figure 1.37. The left hand of the same infant as in Figures 1.34-1.36 with Carpenter's syndrome shows the polysyndactyly. Note the extra digit and the syndactyly which presents in the form of webbing.

Extra Digits Newborns

Figure 1.38. Symmetrical polysyndactyly of the feet in the same infant with Carpenter's syndrome.

1.39

Carpenter Syndrome Pictures
Figure 1.39. Radiographs of the feet and the right hand in the same infant with Carpenter's syndrome.
Carpenter Syndrome

Figure 1.40. This neonate presented with the typical features of Crouzon's disease (craniofacial dysostosis). Note the deformed skull due to craniosynostosis of the coronal, sagittal, and metopic sutures. There is an antimongoloid slant to the eyes, shallow orbits with hypertelorism and hypoplasia of the facial bones. The nose is short with a low bridge. There is a short upper lip with a protruding lower lip. These infants may later develop exophthalmos.

Bicoronal Brachycephaly

Figure 1.41. Lateral view of the same infant. Note the brachycephaly, high forehead, shallow orbits, and hypoplastic maxilla. This gives the appearance of a "dished-in" facies. The mandible may appear to be prognathic in contrast. Radiographs of the skull of these infants show premature synostosis with shortening of the base of the skull and narrowed optic foramina. Surgical treatment is essential.

Figure 1.41. Lateral view of the same infant. Note the brachycephaly, high forehead, shallow orbits, and hypoplastic maxilla. This gives the appearance of a "dished-in" facies. The mandible may appear to be prognathic in contrast. Radiographs of the skull of these infants show premature synostosis with shortening of the base of the skull and narrowed optic foramina. Surgical treatment is essential.

Figure 1.40. This neonate presented with the typical features of Crouzon's disease (craniofacial dysostosis). Note the deformed skull due to craniosynostosis of the coronal, sagittal, and metopic sutures. There is an antimongoloid slant to the eyes, shallow orbits with hypertelorism and hypoplasia of the facial bones. The nose is short with a low bridge. There is a short upper lip with a protruding lower lip. These infants may later develop exophthalmos.

Figure 1.42. A 3-month-old infant with Crouzon's disease. Note the previous findings but in addition there is exophthalmos. Exophthalmos is not usually present at birth but develops later.

Infant Exophthalmos

1.42

Crouzon Syndrome

Figure 1.43. A flat facies is seen in many syndromes. It should be recognized that normal infants, such as this neonate, may present with the same appearance. Note the prominent forehead, flat nose and mild micrognathia which results in the flat facies.

1.44

Figure 1.43. A flat facies is seen in many syndromes. It should be recognized that normal infants, such as this neonate, may present with the same appearance. Note the prominent forehead, flat nose and mild micrognathia which results in the flat facies.

Newborn With Flat Noses

Figure 1.44. This normal infant has what appears to be a depressed nasal bridge. The mother had the same facies. Bulging over the nasal bridge, which appears when the infant cries may indicate the presence of an anterior encephalocele.

Asymmetric Crying Facies

Figure 1.45. When too much tissue develops in (or migrates into) the upper midfacial zone it causes varying degrees of frontonasal dysplasia. The nasal bridge is broad, and extreme hypertelorism is always present. In severe cases there may be several centimeters of separation, with aberrant formation of the philtrum and upper lip (such as an extremely short philtrum and a tented upper lip). This infant is an example of a median cleft nose (frontonasal dysplasia). Note the prominent epicanthic folds. Although nasal clefting may be a normal variant, prominent midline clefting may be associated with holoprosencephaly, as part of the median cleft syndrome, and thus requires a diagnostic evaluation. CT scan in this infant confirmed the presence of holoprosencephaly.

Figure 1.46. Note the median nasal pit in this infant. As with any midline lesion on the head or back, one should check to be sure this does not represent the end of a tract that communicates with the central nervous system. Danger signs include hairs implanted in the pit, fluid emerging from its depths or any underlying bony defect or cystic mass.

Figure 1.46. Note the median nasal pit in this infant. As with any midline lesion on the head or back, one should check to be sure this does not represent the end of a tract that communicates with the central nervous system. Danger signs include hairs implanted in the pit, fluid emerging from its depths or any underlying bony defect or cystic mass.

Diabetic Dermopathy
Figure 1.47. Lateral nasal clefts may occur in otherwise normal infants.
Syndrome Carpenter
Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

This ebook provides an introductory explanation of the workings of the human body, with an effort to draw connections between the body systems and explain their interdependencies. A framework for the book is homeostasis and how the body maintains balance within each system. This is intended as a first introduction to physiology for a college-level course.

Get My Free Ebook


Responses

  • Cino
    What is a protruding forehead?
    8 years ago
  • guarino
    What is carpenter syndrome?
    7 years ago
  • rezene
    When do babies get hairnewborn with prominent frontal suture?
    7 years ago
  • jaana
    Why newborn high forehead?
    7 years ago
  • willard
    How to grow black people hair?
    7 years ago
  • bungo
    Can protruding forehead in children reduce in adulthood?
    2 years ago

Post a comment