Kleeblattschadel

Figure 1.19. Trigonocephaly is due to premature fusion of the metopic suture and is represented clinically by a triangular-shaped head. This condition may occur in utero or in the first months of life. It may occur in otherwise normal infants, but is also seen in infants with chromosomal anomalies or the median cleft syndrome.

Kleeblattsch Del Syndrome
Figure 1.20. Another example of less severe trigonocephaly.

1.21

Trigonocephaly

Figure 1.21. Note the asynclitism of the skull (plagio-cephaly) associated with premature fusion of a single coronal suture. Plagiocephaly (oblique-shaped skull) occurs with premature fusion of a single suture (such as the coronal or lamb-doidal) or with a congenital postural deformity. There is flattening of the diagonally opposite corners of the head (e.g., the right frontal and left occipital areas). In more severe cases, asymmetry of the facial features may also be seen. If plagio-cephaly occurs as a result of a deformation, it is transient and corrects spontaneously. The combination of plagiocephaly and torticollis is well recognized.

Kleeblattsch Del

Figure 1.22. Kleeblattsch├Ądel ("cloverleaf" skull) is the result of premature fusion of the sagittal and coronal sutures. There is a trilobed appearance of the skull with indentations in the center and in the temporal regions. The ears are low set and the nasal bridge is depressed. This condition may occur in otherwise normal infants but is also noted in skeletal dysplastic conditions such as thanatophoric dwarfism.

Figure 1.22. Kleeblattsch├Ądel ("cloverleaf" skull) is the result of premature fusion of the sagittal and coronal sutures. There is a trilobed appearance of the skull with indentations in the center and in the temporal regions. The ears are low set and the nasal bridge is depressed. This condition may occur in otherwise normal infants but is also noted in skeletal dysplastic conditions such as thanatophoric dwarfism.

Figure 1.23. Another example of a "cloverleaf" skull. The brain is forced to grow through the anterior and temporal fontanelles resulting in upward and lateral growth.

Figure 1.24. A frontal radiograph of "cloverleaf" skull in an infant exhibiting thanatophoric dwarfism.

Figure 1.23. Another example of a "cloverleaf" skull. The brain is forced to grow through the anterior and temporal fontanelles resulting in upward and lateral growth.

Low Set Ears Normal

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Cloverleaf Skull Syndrome
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