Abscess On Scalp

Tetanic Spasm

Figure 2.57. This infant with neonatal tetanus has the typical trismus giving rise to the risus sardonicus and tetanic spasm. Especially note the hands. Risus sardonicus is a grinning expression produced by spasm of the facial muscles.

Figure 2.55. These gangrenous lesions associated widi bacteremia caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa demonstrate how devastating this infection can be.

Figure 2.56. The typical opisthotonic appearance in an infant with neonatal tetanus. Note the head retraction, arching of the spine, and the hyperextension of the extremities resulting in a rigid posture. Neonatal tetanus is caused by gram-positive anaerobic spores of Clostridium tetani, present in the soil and in animal and human feces. Infection usually occurs after contamination of the umbilical stump that may result from unsanitary delivery or unclean handling of the cord. In developing countries the incidence of neonatal tetanus remains high.

Figure 2.57. This infant with neonatal tetanus has the typical trismus giving rise to the risus sardonicus and tetanic spasm. Especially note the hands. Risus sardonicus is a grinning expression produced by spasm of the facial muscles.

Figure 2.58. This infant with an omphalocele was delivered by a lay midwife under poor hygienic conditions. He developed tetanus at the age of 4 days and shows the typical risus sardonicus. (Cabrera-Meza, G.)

Risus Sardonicus

Figure 2.59. Close-up view of the face of the same infant as in Figure 2.58 showing the risus sardonicus. Note the excess secretions. (Cabrera-Meza, G.)

Figure 2.60. Lateral radiograph of a skull. Note the gas in a scalp abscess caused by a localized infection by a gas-forming organism.

Risus Sardonicus
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