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Scalp Face

Figure 2.111. Herpetic lesions present on the vulva following a breech presentation. Note also the presence of ecchymoses. Skin lesions occur most often on the scalp and face, the areas which are closest to and in longest contact with the cervical area from which infection is transmitted. Involvement of the cornea in vertex presentations and the genitalia in breech presentations is thus common in herpetic infection.

Figure 2.111. Herpetic lesions present on the vulva following a breech presentation. Note also the presence of ecchymoses. Skin lesions occur most often on the scalp and face, the areas which are closest to and in longest contact with the cervical area from which infection is transmitted. Involvement of the cornea in vertex presentations and the genitalia in breech presentations is thus common in herpetic infection.

Figure 2.112. Herpetic skin lesions on the neck of a premature infant. A simple Gram stain or Tzanck test would differentiate this from staphylococ-cal infection. The presence of multinucleated giant cells containing intranuclear inclusions (balloon cells) are characteristic of viral infection.

Figure 2.113. This infant with severe intrauterine growth retardation developed herpetic skin lesions and encephalitis. The infant was treated with acyclovir and improved, but the EEG and CT scan were grossly abnormal. One month following treatment he developed a fresh crop of lesions on the right hand (vesicles with paronychia) with resolution after a second course of acy-clovir.

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