Higoumenakis Sign Clavicle

Wimberger Sign

Figure 2.87. Wimberger's sign in an infant with congenital syphilis is recognized by radiolucency due to erosion of the medial aspect of the proximal tibial metaphysis. Painless effusion in one or both knees (Clutton's joints) generally becomes apparent between 8 to 15 years of age, involutes spontaneously and leaves no residual effects.

Figure 2.87. Wimberger's sign in an infant with congenital syphilis is recognized by radiolucency due to erosion of the medial aspect of the proximal tibial metaphysis. Painless effusion in one or both knees (Clutton's joints) generally becomes apparent between 8 to 15 years of age, involutes spontaneously and leaves no residual effects.

Figure 2.88. Higoumenaki's sign refers to periostitis of the clavicle. This may be observed clinically or radiographically and is a diagnostic finding in congenital syphilis. Note also the periostitis of the ribs. Fracture of the clavicle with callus formation should be a consideration in the differential diagnosis.

Higoumenakis Sign Clavicle
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