Info

Syndrome Adams Oliver
Figure 1.91. The severe congenital scalp defect in this infant occurred in the Adams-Oliver syndrome, which is a disruption sequence associated with limb reduction anomalies and scalp and skin defects as a result of amniotic bands.

Figure 1.92. The same infant showing the marked aplasia cutis congenita in the skin of the abdomen with dilated superficial capillaries. This is an example of aplasia of the skin affecting the trunk as a result of amniotic bands. It is quite rare.

Figure 1.93. Congenital skin defect of the thigh in an infant. It is not known whether this type of disruption results from an intrinsic abnormality of the skin itself or whether aberrant bands of amni-otic tissue adhere to intact fetal skin. Some cases of scarring of the skin, especially if linear, have been associated with prenatal varicella infections.

Figure 1.94. Congenital alopecia is usually an autosomal recessive disorder but may be an isolated event. Hair development begins at about week 14 of gestation, and from gestational week 20 until birth the body is covered with fine lanugo hair. This is gradually replaced during the first months of postnatal life with coarser, moderately pigmented vellus hair. Alopecia or hypotri-chosis occurs in several syndromes (e.g., ectodermal dysplasia where the hair is sparse over the scalp, eyebrows, and eyelashes; progeria; Hallermann-Streiff syndrome; and cartilage-hair hypoplasia).

Figure 1.95. The scalp of this infant showed a patchy alopecia at birth. A hair whorl is situated over the part of the brain growing most rapidly from about 16 to 19 weeks of gestation. The normal position is slightly lateral to the midline in the posterior parietal zone. It appears that this patch of alopecia is related to this. Physiologic "frictional" alopecia usually occurs over the occipital region as a result of head rolling and friction producing hair loss on the back of the head. It is poorly circumscribed and resolves completely once the infant is able to change its position at will.

Figure 1.96. Hypertrichosis is seen in normal infants, especially in hispanic infants who tend to have more hair than caucasian or black infants. In hispanics especially there may be hairy ears with long coarse dark hair emerging from the lateral and posterior surface of the pinna.

Figure 1.96. Hypertrichosis is seen in normal infants, especially in hispanic infants who tend to have more hair than caucasian or black infants. In hispanics especially there may be hairy ears with long coarse dark hair emerging from the lateral and posterior surface of the pinna.

Hair Loss Prevention

Hair Loss Prevention

The best start to preventing hair loss is understanding the basics of hair what it is, how it grows, what system malfunctions can cause it to stop growing. And this ebook will cover the bases for you. Note that the contents here are not presented from a medical practitioner, and that any and all dietary and medical planning should be made under the guidance of your own medical and health practitioners. This content only presents overviews of hair loss prevention research for educational purposes and does not replace medical advice from a professional physician.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment