Pseudomonas Cellulitis

Figure 2.49. In the same infant as in Figure 2.47 and 2.48, the infraclavicular lesion broke down with severe damage to the underlying subcutaneous tissue and muscle ulceration developed; this healed with scarring over time. Note the lesion at the age of 37 days.

Figure 2.50. The same infant as in Figure 2.47 to 2.49 at the age of 57 days showing the lesions with breakdown and healing on the back.

Figure 2.51. Typical "fried egg" appearance (necrotic center with surrounding inflammation) of skin lesions associated with Pseudomonas infection are seen in this 4-day-old neonate. This lesion developed at the site of a Vitamin K injection. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is usually a cause of late-onset disease in infants who are presumably infected via equipment, aqueous solutions or, on occasion, the hands of health care personnel.

The same infant with Pseudomonas infection shows healing at die age of nine days. Note the necrotic center. These lesions are indolent and slow healing.

Figure 2.52. This infant with Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis and meningitis was acutely ill and had convulsions. He developed multiple skin lesions at the age of 12 days. Convulsions were controlled with difficulty and the infant died one week later. Although it is very uncommon, Pseudomonas conjunctivitis (a very purulent conjunctivitis) may be a devastating disease and if not promptly recognized and treated there may be rapid progression to septicemia, shock, and death. Pseudomonas sepsis may also cause purpura fulminans (thrombo-cytopenia, and clinical and laboratory signs of disseminated intra-vascular coagulopathy).

Figure 2.53. Close-up view of the typical lesions in the same infant. The cutaneous eruption in Pseudomonas infection consists of pearly vesicles on an erythematous background, which rapidly become purulent green or hemorrhagic. When the lesion ruptures, a circumscribed ulcer with a necrotic base appears and may persist surrounded by a purplish cellulitis.

Figure 2.54. The typical lesions were also present on the soles of the feet. These lesions should not be confused with the lesions of syphilitic pemphigus.

Figure 2.53. Close-up view of the typical lesions in the same infant. The cutaneous eruption in Pseudomonas infection consists of pearly vesicles on an erythematous background, which rapidly become purulent green or hemorrhagic. When the lesion ruptures, a circumscribed ulcer with a necrotic base appears and may persist surrounded by a purplish cellulitis.

Pseudomonas Sepsis
How To Reduce Acne Scarring

How To Reduce Acne Scarring

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