Desquamation Ichthyosis

Ichthyosis Scales

Figure 1.217. Another infant with a milder form of lamellar ichthyosis in which the parchment-like appearance of the skin is not as generalized. The skin develops widespread scaliness which may result in a generalized scaly erythroderma. If scaling and erythroderma are extensive, diere may be excessive fluid loss resulting in hypernatremia, dehydration, and temperature instability. These infants are also more susceptible to infection.

Figure 1.218. Close-up of the face of the same infant as in Figure 1.217, showing the parchment-like appearance of the skin and the mild ectropion.

Figure 1.219. Close-up of the abdominal wall and thigh of the same infant as in Figures 1.217 and 1.218 with lamellar ichthyosis. Note the ichthyotic appearance of the skin, particularly in the upper abdomen, and the marked fissuring of the skin below as a result of spontaneous peeling. The underlying skin may be normal or may scale and form a new membrane. Lamellar scales are most prominent over the face, trunk, and extremities. Nail involvement is variable.

Figure 1.220. Congenital ichthyosis may present as a hyperkeratotic form in which widespread scaling occurs frequently widi underlying erythroderma.

Figure 1.221. In bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (epidermolytic hyperkeratosis) there is a combination of bullous lesions, erythema, and desquamation. The presence of bullae is highly characteristic of this disorder. The blisters occur in crops and vary from 0.5 cm to several cm in diameter. They are superficial, tender, and when ruptured leave raw denuded areas. The bullous lesions present at birth and result in the erythema and scaling as noted here. The differential diagnosis includes epidermolysis bullosa, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and the different types of ichthyosis.

Epidermolytic Hyperkeratosis

Figure 1.222. The torso of the same infant as in Figure 1.221 showing the typical erythema and desquamation following rupture of the bullous lesions. Improvement is rapid in these infants and with healing a generalized hyperkeratosis may remain. This consists of thick grayish-brown scales which cover most of the skin surface especially the flexural creases and inter-triginous areas which may show marked involvement often with furrowed hyperkeratosis.

Figure 1.222. The torso of the same infant as in Figure 1.221 showing the typical erythema and desquamation following rupture of the bullous lesions. Improvement is rapid in these infants and with healing a generalized hyperkeratosis may remain. This consists of thick grayish-brown scales which cover most of the skin surface especially the flexural creases and inter-triginous areas which may show marked involvement often with furrowed hyperkeratosis.

Ichthyotic
How To Deal With Rosacea and Eczema

How To Deal With Rosacea and Eczema

Rosacea and Eczema are two skin conditions that are fairly commonly found throughout the world. Each of them is characterized by different features, and can be both discomfiting as well as result in undesirable appearance features. In a nutshell, theyre problems that many would want to deal with.

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