Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome

Scalded Skin Syndrome Infant

Figure 2.27. In this infant with the staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, the bullous lesions have ruptured, resulting in the scalded skin appearance. Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome is also known as Ritter's disease.

Figure 2.26. In the same infant there is rupture of the bullae. These infants present with the typical Nikolsky's sign in that there is skin exfoliation which peels on touch.

Figure 2.27. In this infant with the staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, the bullous lesions have ruptured, resulting in the scalded skin appearance. Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome is also known as Ritter's disease.

Figure 2.28. This infant had rapid progressive toxic epidermal necrolysis. The face is usually affected first and progression may rapidly become generalized. This condition is most commonly due to phage group type II staphylococci, and the toxin from the organism causes the severe exfoliative dermatitis which results in the systemic manifestations of fever, instability and water loss.

Toxic Epidermal Necrosis
Figure 2.29. The body, buttocks and lower extremities of the same infant showing the very extensive "scalding" of the skin.
Necrotizing Fasciitis The Labia

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