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Home Remedy For Staph Infection

Figure 7.14. Appearance of the heels of a low birth-weight premature infant after repeated "heel-sticks." This can be avoided by warming of the heel and more gentle squeezing of the heel when collecting blood. Miscalculation of the water temperature when warming a heel may cause scalding and a skin burn. (Landers, S.)

Figure 7.13. Slightly fluctuant erythematous mid-line back lesion in an infant with a staphylococcal abscess following lumbar puncture.

Figure 7.14. Appearance of the heels of a low birth-weight premature infant after repeated "heel-sticks." This can be avoided by warming of the heel and more gentle squeezing of the heel when collecting blood. Miscalculation of the water temperature when warming a heel may cause scalding and a skin burn. (Landers, S.)

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Warming Heel Puncture

Figure 7.15. Radiograph of the feet of an infant with osteomyelitis of the calcaneus (on the left) following "heel-stick" trauma. The other heel is normal (on the right). One of the most common methods in infants of collecting laboratory blood specimens for analysis is by "heel-stick."

Figure 7.15. Radiograph of the feet of an infant with osteomyelitis of the calcaneus (on the left) following "heel-stick" trauma. The other heel is normal (on the right). One of the most common methods in infants of collecting laboratory blood specimens for analysis is by "heel-stick."

Figure 7.16. Radiograph of an infant with a spiral fracture of the distal end of the tibia. This fracture is the result of increased angulation with force applied by a technician collecting a "heel-stick" blood specimen. On the left, note the fresh fracture. On the right, note the healing fracture 3 weeks later. This infant had congenital syphilis. On initial radiographs there were growth arrest lines in the proximal tibia and distal femur, but the tibia was otherwise normal.

Figure 7.17. Edema, bullous excoriation and discoloration of the foot of an infant following dislodgment of the needle from an infusion pump. Ulceration due to extravasation of intravenous infusion fluid may follow subcutaneous leakage of any hypertonic solution, but those containing calcium are particularly irritating.

Hypertonic Intravenous Fluids

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Figure 7.18. Soft tissue infiltration following continuous infusion with a needle displaced out of the vein. If these areas are large, they may subsequently require a skin graft.

Figure 7.18. Soft tissue infiltration following continuous infusion with a needle displaced out of the vein. If these areas are large, they may subsequently require a skin graft.

Subcutaneous Intravenous Fluids Infant

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