Figure 1239

Risks to the related donor when the recipient has familial renal disease. Donors for relatives with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) may be permitted to donate if over 25 years old and results on renal imaging are negative for cysts. Some younger persons may be permitted to donate if genetic studies indicate that the risk for subsequent ADPKD is very low. Male relatives of individuals with hereditary nephritis can be donors if they do not have hematuria. Male relatives with hematuria cannot be donors. Female relatives without hematuria may donate; however, women of child-bearing age who might be carriers must consider the possibility of someday donating a kidney to a child of their own with the disease. Female relatives with hematuria should not donate when other evidence of renal disease exists; however, in the absence of such evidence the exact risk of donation is unknown. Occasionally, donors with isolated microhema-turia (not hereditary) and a negative evaluation may be suitable donors. (From Kasiske and coworkers [2]; with permission.)

Final evaluation of prospective living donors

Final evaluation of prospective living donors

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