Spinocerebellar Tract

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Cerebellum: Afferent Pathways

Superior cerebellar peduncle

Middle cerebellar peduncle

Cortical input

Nucleus reticularis tegmenti pontis

Pontine nuclei (contralateral)

Spinal input

Inferior olive

Upper part of medulla oblongata

Spinal input

Neurophysiology Parts Cerebellum

To contralateral cerebellar cortex

Primary fissure

Functional Subdivisions of Cerebellum

Hemisphere Vermis

From skin (touch and pressure)

From muscle (spindles and Golgi tendon organs)

Dorsal spinocerebellar tract

Figure 2.21 Cerebellar Afferent Pathways

Cortical input

Nucleus reticularis tegmenti pontis

Pontine nuclei (contralateral)

Spinal input

Inferior olive

Upper part of medulla oblongata

Spinal input

Vestibular nerve and ganglion

Lower part of medulla oblongata

Cortical input

Lateral reticular nucleus

Spinal input

Cervical part of spinal cord

Motor interneuron

Rostral spinocerebellar tract

Spinal border cells

Motor interneuron

Lumbar part of spinal cord

Clarke's column

Ventral spinocerebellar tract

To contralateral cerebellar cortex

Primary fissure

Functional Subdivisions of Cerebellum

Hemisphere Vermis

Inter-i

Lateral mediate part part

Leg zone Arm zone Face zone

Anterior lobe

Primary ""i^/fissure

External cuneate nucleus (relay for proprioceptive information)

From skin (touch and pressure)

From muscle (spindles and Golgi tendon organs)

From skin and deep tissues (pain and Golgi tendon organs)

From skin (touch and pressure) and from muscle (spindles and Golgi tendon organs)

Dorsal spinocerebellar tract

2nd spinal projection area (gracile lobule)

Archi-cerebellum (vestibulo- j cerebellum) Paleocerebellum (spinocerebellum)

Leg zone Arm zone Face zone

Cerebellum Paleocerebellum

Lingula Flocculus Nodule Uvula Pyramid Vermis

Middle (posterior) lobe

Posterolateral fissure

Flocculo-nodular lobe

Neocerebellum i Middle vermis (pontocerebellum) Hemisphere

Neocerebellum i Middle vermis (pontocerebellum) Hemisphere

Flocculus Facial Nerve

Schema of theoretical "unfolding" of cerebellar surface in derivation of above diagram

Figure 2.21 Cerebellar Afferent Pathways

The cerebellum plays an important role in coordinating movement. It receives sensory information and then influences descending motor pathways to produce fine, smooth, and coordinated motion. The cerebellum is divided into three general areas: archicerebellum (also called vestibulocerebellum) paleocerebellum (also called spinocere-bellum) and the neocerebellum (also called the cerebrocerebellum). The archicerebellum is primarily involved in controlling posture and balance, as well as the movement of the head and eyes. It receives afferent signals from the vestibular apparatus and then sends efferent fibers to the appropriate descending motor pathways. The paleocere bellum primarily controls movement of the proximal portions of the limbs. It receives sensory information on limb position and muscle tone and then modifies and coordinates these movements through efferent pathways to the appropriate descending motor pathways. The neocerebellum is the largest portion of the cerebellum, and it coordinates the movement of the distal portions of the limbs. It receives input from the cerebral cortex and thus helps in the planning of motor activity (e.g., seeing a pencil and then planning and executing the movement of the arm and hand to pick it up).

Cerebellum: Efferent Pathways

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