Anatomy of the Systemic Veins

Objectives

When you have completed this section, you should be able to

• identify the principal veins of the systemic circuit; and

• trace the flow of blood from any major organ to the heart.

The principal veins of the systemic circuit (fig. 20.32) are detailed in tables 20.9 through 20.14. While arteries are usually deep and well protected, veins occur in both

Answer the following questions to test your understanding of the preceding section:

25. Concisely contrast the destinations of the external and internal carotid arteries.

Carotid Pressure Point
Figure 20.31 Arterial Pressure Points. (a) Areas where arteries lie close enough to the surface that a pulse can be palpated or pressure can be applied to reduce arterial bleeding. (b) Structures in the femoral triangle. (c) Boundaries of the femoral triangle.

Saladin: Anatomy & I 20. The Circulatory System: I Text I © The McGraw-Hill

Physiology: The Unity of Blood Vessels and Companies, 2003

Form and Function, Third Circulation Edition

782 Part Four Regulation and Maintenance

Subclavian v. Brachiocephalic v. Axillary v. Cephalic v. Brachial v Basilic v.

Superior vena cava Inferior vena cava Hepatic v. Renal v Ulnar v. Radial v.

Femoral v

Popliteal v.

Posterior tibial v

Anterior tibial v.

Femoral v

Popliteal v.

Posterior tibial v

Anterior tibial v.

Systemic Veins

External jugular v. Internal jugular v. Internal thoracic v.

Cardiac vv. Brachial v. Cephalic v. Median cubital v.

Common iliac v.

Internal iliac v. External iliac v.

Gonadal v.

Great saphenous v.

Figure 20.32 The Major Systemic Veins. (v.= vein; vv. = veins)

External jugular v. Internal jugular v. Internal thoracic v.

Cardiac vv. Brachial v. Cephalic v. Median cubital v.

Common iliac v.

Internal iliac v. External iliac v.

Gonadal v.

Great saphenous v.

Figure 20.32 The Major Systemic Veins. (v.= vein; vv. = veins)

deep and superficial groups; you may be able to see quite a few of them in your arms and hands. Deep veins run parallel to the arteries and often have similar names (femoral artery and femoral vein, for example); this is not true of the superficial veins, however. The deep veins are not described in as much detail as the arteries were, since it can usually be assumed that they drain the same structures as the corresponding arteries supply.

In general, we began the study of arteries with those lying close to the heart and progressed away. In the venous system, by contrast, we begin with those that are remote from the heart and follow the flow of blood as they join each other and approach the heart. Venous pathways have more anastomoses than arterial pathways, so the route of blood flow is often not as clear. Many anastomoses are omitted from the following figures for clarity.

Saladin: Anatomy & I 20. The Circulatory System: I Text I © The McGraw-Hill

Physiology: The Unity of Blood Vessels and Companies, 2003

Form and Function, Third Circulation Edition

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Responses

  • Natalino
    Where can pulse be palpated?
    5 years ago

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