Table 207 Arterial Supply to the Abdomen continued

locate these branches in the figure and identify the points of anastomosis. The short, stubby celiac trunk is a median branch of the aorta. It immediately gives rise to three principal subdivisions—the common hepatic, left gastric, and splenic arteries: 1. The common hepatic artery issues two main branches:

a. the gastroduodenal artery, which supplies the stomach, anastomoses with the right gastroepiploic artery (see following), and then continues as the inferior pancreaticoduodenal (PAN-cree-AT-ih-co-dew-ODD-eh-nul) artery, which supplies the duodenum and pancreas before anastomosing with the superior mesenteric artery; and b. the proper hepatic artery, which is the continuation of the common hepatic artery after it gives off the gastroduodenal artery. It enters the inferior surface of the liver and supplies the liver and gallbladder.

Liver

Proper hepatic a

Common hepatic a

R. gastric a. Gallbladder Gastroduodenal a Duodenum R. gastroepiploic

Inferior vena cava

Proper hepatic a

Common hepatic a.

Gastroepiploica Artery

Gastroduodenal a. R. gastroepiploic a

Inferior pancreaticoduodenal a

Superior mesenteric a.

Proper hepatic a

Common hepatic a.

Gastroduodenal a. R. gastroepiploic a

Inferior pancreaticoduodenal a

Esophagus Spleen

L. gastric a. Splenic a.

gastroepiploic a. Celiac trunk Pancreas

Superior mesenteric a.

Abdominal aorta

Spleen L. gastric a. L. gastroepiploic a.

Superior mesenteric a.

Figure 20.27 Branches of the Celiac Trunk.

Saladin: Anatomy & I 20. The Circulatory System: I Text

Physiology: The Unity of Blood Vessels and

Form and Function, Third Circulation Edition

2. The left gastric artery supplies the stomach and lower esophagus, arcs around the lesser curvature of the stomach, becomes the right gastric artery (which supplies the stomach and duodenum), and then anastomoses with the proper hepatic artery.

3. The splenic artery supplies blood to the spleen, but gives off the following branches on its way there:

a. the pancreatic arteries (not illustrated), which supply the pancreas; and b. the left gastroepiploic20 (GAS-tro-EP-ih-PLO-ic) artery, which arcs around the greater curvature of the stomach, becomes the right gastroepiploic artery, and then anastomoses with the gastroduodenal artery. Along the way, it supplies blood to the stomach and greater omentum (a fatty membrane suspended from the greater curvature).

Mesenteric Circulation

The mesentery (see atlas A, p. 38) contains numerous mesenteric arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels that perfuse and drain the intestines. The arterial supply issues from the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries (fig. 20.28); numerous anastomoses between these ensure collateral circulation and adequate perfusion of the intestinal tract even if one route becomes obstructed. The following branches of the superior mesenteric artery serve the small intestine and most of the large intestine, among other organs:

1. The inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery, already mentioned, is an anastomosis from the gastroduodenal to the superior mesenteric artery; it supplies the pancreas and duodenum.

2. The intestinal arteries supply nearly all of the small intestine (jejunum and ileum).

3. The ileocolic (ILL-ee-oh-CO-lic) artery supplies the ileum of the small intestine and the appendix, cecum, and ascending colon.

4. The right colic artery supplies the ascending colon.

5. The middle colic artery supplies the transverse colon.

Branches of the inferior mesenteric artery serve the distal part of the large intestine:

1. The left colic artery supplies the transverse and descending colon.

2. The sigmoid arteries supply the descending and sigmoid colon.

3. The superior rectal artery supplies the rectum.

Ascending colon

Transverse (

Celiac trunk

Superior rec

Aorta

Middle colic

Ileum

Ileocolic a.

Ascending colon

Transverse (

Celiac trunk

Superior rec

Middle colic

Ileocolic a.

Stomach Arterial Supply

Common iliac a.

Superior mesenteric a.

Intestinal aa. Sigmoid a.

Descending colon

mesenteric a

Sigmoid colon

Figure 20.28 The Mesenteric Arteries.

5gastro = stomach + epi = upon, above + ploic = pertaining to the greater omentum

Saladin: Anatomy & I 20. The Circulatory System: I Text I © The McGraw-Hill

Physiology: The Unity of Blood Vessels and Companies, 2003

Form and Function, Third Circulation Edition

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  • millar
    Is the ovary above the sigmoid colon?
    8 years ago
  • sarah
    What is the artery between abdominal aorta ascending colon?
    8 years ago

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